Electricians Covering London & Kent

EICR Report

Sometimes known as a landlords report,condition report or landlords electrical certificate the EICR report is an important safety process for landlords and homeowners alike. Even more so now that the uk has updated the legislation on carrying out the Electrical inspection Condition report.

The Why Do You Need an EICR?

If you are a landlord, a Satisfactory EICR is a legal requirement.

From 1st June 2020, private landlords in England are required to have the electrical installation in their rental properties checked by a qualified electrician to ensure that they are safe for tenants.

  • Electrical installations must be inspected and tested prior to the start of a new tenancy from 1st July 2020
  • Checks must be carried out on any existing tenancies by 1st April 2021

Landlords are also required to supply a copy of the EICR to the existing tenant and complete works within 28 days.

Further detailed information can be found  on the GOV.uk webpage HERE

The EICR is an inspection on your property, it is a two part process, part 1 is a visual inspection and part 2 is the testing of circuitry. Once complete you will be issued with an EICR this will contain information on the condition of your electrical installation, the EICR will with be satisfactory or unsatisfactory. It will list an faults or failures, these are reported via codes, please see below for some detailed information on EICR coding details

 

Code C1

A Code 1 (C1) observation means ‘ Danger present. Risk of injury. Immediate remedial action required.’

 

Code C2

A Code 2 (C2) is not as severe as a C1, but is still a potentially dangerous defect. They may not pose an immediate threat but are likely to become a danger in the future. A C2 is described as ‘Potentially dangerous – urgent remedial action required.’

 

Code C3

Code 3 is described as ‘Improvement recommended.’

This means something has been identified which does not comply with the latest regulations but isn’t actually dangerous. For example, the installation may not comply with the current version of the regulations or may have damaged fittings which do not have exposed live parts. A code C3, in itself, should not warrant an overall unsatisfactory EICR report.